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Volvo C30

C30 Series II

Volvo logo1 May 2010

VOLVO’S C30 fronted the new decade with a heavy dose of botox, a light diesel engine application, more standard features, and no increase in prices.

The Swedes also added the DRIVe model that only just trails the Ford Fiesta Econetic as Australia’s most economical car, beating out the Toyota Prius hybrid in the process.

Its 1.6-litre turbo-diesel unit joins the 2.0D four-cylinder turbo-diesel introduced in the last of the pre-facelift C30s in November 2009, which in turn usurped the old 2.4-litre D5 five-cylinder turbo-diesel that was available in the C30 since January 2008.

All MY10 C30 models boast an altered front-end appearance that is meant to connect them to the newer XC60 SUV and second-generation S60 sedan due out soon.

A keener eye is needed to spot the changes to the rear, which basically run to more body-coloured or contrasting painted trim in place of black plastic panels as applied to the previous C30, and a revised bumper.

Inside the three-door hatch you will find invigorated hues and trims as well as a wider range of options. Getting in on the wildly successful BMW Mini’s personalisation game is one of Volvo’s main aims with the MY10 C30 makeover.

Underneath the C30 gains what Volvo calls a ‘considerably sharper’ sport chassis option, with stiffer suspension and faster steering for improved dynamics.

On the safety front, all cars gain Volvo’s Emergency Brake Light system that flashes the brake lights five times per second in a forceful stop.

The mid-spec LE is history, leaving only the base S to use Volvo’s long-lived 125kW/230Nm 2.4-litre twin-cam 20-valve five-cylinder petrol engine – available in five-speed manual or five-speed Geartronic automatic guises.

The other diesel is the 100kW/320Nm 2.0D, employing Ford’s Powershift dual-clutch transmission.

Most C30 buyers choose the evergreen 169kW/320Nm 2.5-litre five-cylinder turbo petrol T5 powerplant.

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