Suzuki Swift (EZ Swift)

Make: Suzuki
Model: EZ Swift

Jan / 2005Release date:

Jan / 2011End date:



ONE of the biggest comeback kids of recent times has been Suzuki’s Swift, absent for five years while the world ignored its dull Ignis successor from 2000 to 2005, before returning to critical acclaim and commercial success.

Clearly inspired by BMW’S Mini, the Swift is a sweetly styled, sporty little light car that brings a certain little something to its class.

Value is one, for even the base Swift includes dual airbags, ABS brakes (with EBD and brake assist), air-conditioning, remote central locking, electric windows/mirrors, a three-spoke leather-clad tiller and a six-speaker CD stereo with steering-mounted switches.

Yet it has been the slightly more expensive S model that’s been a smash with buyers, in no small part due to its side-impact airbags, alloy wheels and fog lights.

Could the S moniker now turn to Safety rather than Sport?

Based on an all-new chassis, the relatively wide tracked front-wheel driver rests on a 2390mm wheelbase, uses front strut/rear torsion beam suspension and relies on rear drum brakes.

Power comes from a 1.5-litre four-cylinder engine that has variable valve timing and can muster 74kW at 6000rpm and 133Nm at 4000rpm. The transmission is a short-stroke five-speed manual – designed to give a firm and fast shift feel while a four-speed automatic (with gated shift) is also available.

Claimed fuel consumption for the hatchback is 7.0 litres per 100km (combined) for the manual or 7.5L/100km for the auto. Kerb weight ranges from 1030kg to 1060kg, depending on the variant.

The luggage compartment isn’t brilliant though, with a 213-litre volume, extending to 562 litres when the 60/40-split rear bench is folded and tumbled.
In September 2006 Suzuki unleashed the five-door Swift Sport – essentially a spiritual successor to the famed Swift GTi of the 1980s and 1990s.

In September 2006 Suzuki unleashed the five-door Swift Sport – essentially a spiritual successor to the famed Swift GTi of the 1980s and 1990s.

It features a 1.6-litre variable-valve twin-cam four-cylinder engine mated to a close-ratio five-speed manual gearbox; regular Swifts make do with a 75kW/133Nm 1.5-litre unit.

The Sport comes with twin exhausts, 16-inch alloys, dual front, side and curtain airbags, CD/MP3 audio, steering wheel audio controls, air conditioning, electric mirrors/windows, rear spoiler, power steering, remote keyless entry and anti-lock brakes.

Sporty touches inside include a three-spoke leather steering wheel, silver garnished shift knob, stainless steel pedals, illuminated ring around the speedometer and sports seats.

The Swift’s MacPherson strut front and torsion-beam coil-spring rear suspension gains a firmer sports setting with Monroe shock absorbers that have increased compression and rebound dampening forces.










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